The agreement contains a complex set of provisions in a number of areas, including: former British Prime Minister John Major has argued that Brexit could lead to a hard border, with the European Union and the UK being required to control their borders for customs purposes. [54] The Conservative Party`s European research group group believes that the UK could have the choice of not controlling its border if VAT is not applied or of controlling the limit to apply a possible VAT on goods imported after Brexit. [55] [56] The overall result of these problems was to undermine unionists` confidence in the agreement that was exploited by the anti-deal DUP, which eventually overtook the ulcer pro-accord Unionist Party (UUP) in the 2003 parliamentary elections. The UUP had already resigned from the power-sharing executive in 2002 following the Stormontgate scandal, which implicated three men for gathering intelligence. These charges were eventually dropped in 2005 on the controversial grounds that the persecution was not “in the public interest”. Immediately afterwards, one of the incriminated members of Sinn Féin, Denis Donaldson, was unmasked as a British agent. He said Johnson had “brought the EU up to the task” and that they would be “very careful when it comes to making a deal with him because they don`t know if he will stay there.” The agreement was reached between the British and Irish governments and eight political parties or groups in Northern Ireland. Three of them were representative of unionism: the Ulster Unionist Party, which has been running since the beginning of the 20th The Progressive Unionist Party (associated with the Ulster Volunteer Force (EIE) and the Ulster Democratic Party (the political wing of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA) had led the Unionism party in Ulster. Two of them have generally been described as nationalists: the Social Democratic and Labour Party and Sinn Féin, the Republican Party associated with the Commissional Irish Republican Army. [4] [5] Regardless of these rival traditions, there were two other rallying parties, the Alliance Inter-communal party and the Northern Ireland Women`s Coalition. There was also the Labour Coalition.

U.S. Senator George J. . . .