If the administrator of the contract fails to work outside the scope of the contractor, such an omission must be genuine: in other words, the absence of work must be completely removed from the contract, it cannot be used to withdraw work from the contractor to give to another (see for example. B fidic clause 51(1). Similarly, the contract administrator does not have the power to order variations to assist the contractor if the contract work proves to be too difficult or costly for the contractor. Variations are often sources of controversy, either when evaluating the variation or when agreeing on whether part of the work represents a variation, and can cost a lot of time and money during a contract. Although some derogations are unavoidable, it is desirable to minimise potential deviations and subsequent claims by ensuring that uncertainties are removed before contracts are awarded. In other words, the contractor can ignore its offer prices and assert costs and variations. Despite the clear wording of these amending clauses, they may have led to contradictory decisions by the English courts. . .

.